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Any Goldsworthy Wooden Spire at Sunset
Any Goldsworthy Wooden Spire at Sunset
Any Goldsworthy Wooden Spire at Sunset

Presidio Press & Stories

San Francisco Left Its Heart in El Polín Spring

Just up the road to the south of the Inn there is a peaceful green glade full of the sound of birds and the trickle of a water. The waters spring from the underlying serpentine rock and sustain a lush riparian habitat that is one of San Francisco’s most diverse spots for birds, butterflies, and native flora. This spot, El Polín Spring, has been the heart of the human and natural history of San Francisco for many centuries. With its native plant and animal life restored as part of the complex Tennessee Hollow Watershed restoration project, the waters of El Polín now nourish a new generation of San Francisco residents and visitors.

Restoration in Progress | The Tennessee Hollow Watershed

El Polin SpringLong before centuries of military activity and construction projects covered up the area known as The Tennesse Hollow Watershed, it was home to a system where three creeks and freshwater springs came together to create a natural bird habitat and primary freshwater source for the marsh at Crissy Field. By redirecting water, removing fill and re-introducing thousands of native plants a new habitat is being created. Today, thanks to the support of the community over a decade, the MacArthur Meadow is now in the process of being restored. MacArthur Meadow, at the base of the historic Lover’s Lane is where the three creeks originally converged. Once the restoration is complete, an elevated boardwalk and panels highlighting the history and ecology of this site will be set in place for all to enjoy.